ВС Турции

#21
када я тока пришел на ВОЛ
стареем-с :cool:

сорри за оффтоп, но такого я не мог пропустить.

а теперь по делу:
рядовой-к, тут Олег недавно постил ссылки на ЗВО: http://www.waronline.org/forum/viewtopic.php?p=171840#171840. Мне не удалось там найти статью, которая Вам нужна, но у меня многие ссылки не открывались. Может Вам повезет больше. Удачи.
 
#23
http://www.militaryphotos.net/forums/viewtopic.php?t=37609&highlight=turk
Блин, там фотки такого размера! o_O И куча повторяющихся.
Но если кому не жалко трафика, можно просмотреть все 15 страниц и, помимо всего прочего, обнаружить занятный Т-84-120. ;)
 

Олег Грановский

Модератор
Команда форума
#24
По современной дислокации Турецкой Армии:

ARMY SUMMARY

STRENGTH
402,000

INFANTRY
Mechanised Infantry Division × 2
Infantry Division x 1
Mechanised Infantry Brigade × 17

ARMOUR
Brigade × 14

COMMANDO
Brigade × 4

Assessment

In the early 1990s the Turkish Land Force (TLF) was a large but badly equipped infantry force. There were 14 infantry divisions but only one was mechanised, and out of 16 infantry brigades only six were mechanised. The overhaul that has taken place since has produced highly mobile forces with greatly enhanced firepower in accordance with NATO's new strategic concept. The quality and quantity of the army's equipment has been greatly improved, a prime example being the army air arm. Turkish Army Aviation had operated primarily as a tactical transport force but its reconnaissance and attack capabilities have been upgraded significantly, deploying a significant number of combat helicopters.

Turkish soldiers have always been renowned for their fighting qualities and observers continue to be impressed by the endurance they show during a physically demanding training regime. As part of a policy of lessening its dependence on conscripts, the TAF has been seeking to move to an all-professional army. The implementation of this policy was delayed by the campaign to suppress the insurgency of the Kurdistan Workers' Party (PKK). However, the army has managed to recruit a significant number of specialist NCOs from military academies and universities. As of January 2004, 325,000 men out of the total 402,000 were conscripts.

The TLF has more than 4,200 main battle tanks (MBTs) in service, the tank fleet being dominated by 2,876 M48 tanks, of which nearly all have been upgraded in Turkey to M48A5T1 or T2 standard. As of January 2004, the TLF had 658 M60A3 and 274 M60A1 MBTs, all ex-US Army and many upgraded. The transfer of former West German military equipment has brought the number of Leopard A1 and A3 MBTs in the fleet to about 300.

The TLF Command needs to upgrade the quality of the tank fleet, but because of financial restraints has had to cancel its requirement for 1,000 modern MBTs. Progress towards the mechanisation of infantry forces was made with the delivery of 1,698 Armoured Combat Vehicles (ACVs) from FNSS Defence Systems (formerly FMC-Nurol). The army has been taking delivery of a further batch of 551 ACVs from the same manufacturer.

Because of the demands of dealing with the PKK insurgency in the southeast, Turkey sought to increase greatly its purchases of combat helicopters during the 1990s. However, with the dramatic decline in the PKK threat, the demand for large numbers of helicopters is no longer as urgent. The decline in the PKK threat has also meant that the land forces no longer have to focus as much as they did in the past on internal security. The military has continued to have a focus on Turkey's border with Iraq, in light of the ongoing PKK presence in northern Iraq, and the volatile situation in the region in the wake of the 2003 Iraq war.

In recent years Turkey has improved the quality of its Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) fleet by taking delivery of an unspecified number of Harpy platforms from Israel for use against enemy radar sites.

Organisation

The process of re-structuring and professionalising the army began in 1990 and was completed in 1995. From 1999 the Turkish army began moving closer to establishing an all-volunteer professional force. The army is now based on the unit order of corps, brigade and battalion, having eliminated to a large extent divisional and regimental organisational units - the phasing out of several divisional headquarters has allowed greater emphasis to be placed on the role of brigades in undertaking operations. The army is organised as follows:

Army HQ × 4
Corps HQ × 9
Armoured brigade × 14
Mechanised infantry division × 2
Infantry division × 1
Mechanised infantry brigade × 17
Infantry brigade × 9
Commando brigade × 4
Independent infantry regiment × 1
Border defence regiment × 5
Border defence battalion × 26
Presidential Guard regiment × 1

The army's 14 armoured brigades are the most powerful brigades in the restructured organisation; each includes two armoured, two mechanised infantry and two self-propelled artillery battalions. The 17 mechanised brigades each have two armoured, two mechanised and one artillery battalion. The army's nine infantry brigades each have four infantry battalions and one artillery battalion, while the four commando brigades have three commando battalions. The tactical mobility of the infantry and commando brigades is being enhanced by the expansion of the Turkish Army Aviation branch.

It was revealed in June 2004 that the Turkish Armed Forces plan to abolish four brigades across Turkey in a move towards making a reality of its long-delayed plan to make units smaller and lighter. The plan involves the closure of the following units:

33rd Armoured Brigade in Kirklareli on the north-west border with Greece and Bulgaria
7th Mechanised Brigade in Kars/Kagizman near the eastern border with Armenia
10th Infantry Brigade in Van/Ercis on the eastern border with Iran
9th Armoured Brigade in Cankiri in central Anatolia
The arms and equipment of the disbanded brigades will be kept in depots.

These brigade disbandments indicate changes to the military's threat perceptions, in particular in relation to Greece, Armenia and Iran. The decision also signalled Turkish attempts to strengthen its special forces operation units supported by less heavier units to address the global war against terrorism.

Under the re-organisation programme that involved the elimination of most divisions, brigades now report to one of nine corps that are grouped to form four armies.

Turkish Land Forces: organisational structure

Unit, Location/ Commander, Role/ other details

Turkish Land Forces
HQ: Ankara
TLF Commander: Gen. Aytaç Yalman
TLF Chief of Staff: Gen. Fethi Tuncel

TLF Command controls:
* 4 x field armies
* Logistics Command
* Training and Doctrine Command

Presidential Guard Regiment
HQ: Ankara
Security duties

Infantry Brigade
HQ: Ankara
Garrison role

1st Mechanised Division
HQ: Mamak, Ankara

Commander: Major General Umit Sahinturk
Formerly committed to NATO Allied Command Eirope Rapid Reaction Corps (ARRC)

9th Mechanised Brigade
HQ: Canciri

Main body: Kirrikale

28th Mechanised Brigade
HQ: Mamak, Ankara

Main body: Mamak

1st Army
HQ: Istanbul

Commander: General Yasar Buyukanit
Covers Thrace region; focus on borders with Greece and Bulgaria

Rapid Deployable Turkish Corps HQ, based on 3rd Turkish Corps HQ
HQ: near Istanbul

Commander: Lieutenant General Köksal Karabay
NATO rapid deployment role; part of NATO Response Force (NRF)

2nd Army
HQ: Malatya

Commander: General Fevzi Turkeri
Deployed in SE Anatolia; focus on frontier with Iraq and Syria; also counter-insurgency role

3rd Army
HQ: Erzincan

Commander: General Oktar Ataman
Deployed in eastern Anatolia; focus on border with Georgia; also counter-insurgency role

4th Army (Aegean Army)
HQ: Izmir

Commander: General Hursit Tolon
Not committed to NATO; deployed on Turkey's western border; focus on Greece, Aegean region and Cyprus

'Cyprus Turkish Peace Corps'
HQ: Kyrenia (Girne)

Commander: Lt Gen Ahmet Ozteker
Turkish forces stationed in North Cyprus; part of structure of 4th Army

28th Mechanised Infantry Division HQ
HQ: Asha (Pasakoy), NE of Nicosia
Focus on the Green Line

39th Mechanised Infantry Division HQ
HQ: near Morphu (Güzelyurt)
Focus on the Green Line

Corps reserve
Kythrea (Degirmenlik), NE of Nicosia

Other units include:

* Armour Brigade
* Independent Mechanised Infantry Brigade

Turkish Special Forces: Organisation

Turkish Special Forces Command - Head Quarters

1st Commando Brigade - Kayseri
2nd Commando Brigade - Bolu
3rd Commando Brigade - Midyat
Mountain Commando Brigade - Hakkari

Turkish Army Aviation

Turkish Army Aviation is organised on the basis of four aviation regiments, one attack helicopter battalion (with three squadrons deploying AH-1W and AH-1P/S), and three aviation battalions (two training, one transport), in addition to other units.

Units include the following:

1st Aviation Regiment, based at Istanbul-Sarigazi (Samandira), attached to the 1st Army. Commands two or three battalions, deploying UH-1H and AB 205A (utility transport) and U-17B (Observation/Liaison).
2nd Aviation Regiment, based at Malatya, attached to the 2nd Army. Commands two or three battalions, deploying UH-1H and AB 205A (utility transport) and U-17B (Observation/Liaison).
3rd Aviation Regiment, based at Erzincan, attached to the 3rd Army. Commands two or three battalions, deploying S-70A, UH-1H and AB 205A (utility transport) and U-17B (Observation/Liaison). In addition, it directs the operations of an AH-1W combat helicopter squadron, detached from the Attack Helicopter Battalion.
Aegean Aviation Regiment, based at Izmir-Adnan Menderes, attached to the 4th Corps at Ankara. Commands 1 Aviation Battalion deploying UH-1H and AB 205A (Utility Transport); 2 Aviation Battalion deploying Cougar (Utility Transport); 3 Aviation Battalion deploying S-70A (Utility Transport).
Attack Helicopter Battalion, Ankara-Guvercinlik, deploying three attack helicopter squadrons. 1 Squadron deploys AH-1W; 2 Squadron deploys AH-1P/S and 3 Squadron deploys AH-1P/S. (One squadron is attached to the 3rd Aviation Regiment at Erzincan, and one to 7 Corps Tactical Aviation Group at Diyarbakir.)

Other units include:

Special Forces Air Unit, based at Ankara-Guvercinlik, reporting directly to the Chief of General Staff, and attached to the Special Forces. Deploys S-70A and UH-1H (Transport/Combat SAR), and U-17B (Liaison).

Role and Deployment

The land forces are deployed to protect Turkey's borders from external threat and also to maintain internal security. The 1st Army is based in Istanbul, the 2nd Army in Malatya, the 3rd Army in Erzincan and the 4th Army, also known as the Aegean Army, in Izmir. All except the 4th Army have traditionally been available for NATO deployments.

Deployments of the Turkish Land Forces Command's (TLFC's) four armies: The 1st Army covers Thrace, the European part of Turkey. It is strong in armour and is designed for mobile operations along the borders with Bulgaria and Greece and the shores of the Black Sea. The 1st Army was formerly Turkey's western bulwark against the forces of the Warsaw Pact.

The 2nd Army is deployed in southeastern Anatolia and adopts a defensive posture facing Syria, Iraq and Iran. During the 1990s it was heavily involved in operations against the PKK insurgency.

The 3rd Army covers the borders with Georgia and the traditional invasion routes from the east. It deploys units in the rugged mountainous region of eastern Anatolia, an area that provides many natural defences against any major incursion of armour from the east. The 3rd Army was formerly Turkey's eastern defence against the forces of the Warsaw Pact. Like the 2nd Army, during the 1990s it was heavily involved in suppressing the insurgency of the PKK.

The 4th Army, which is not assigned to NATO, is deployed on Turkey's western border, facing the Greek Aegean islands, Greece being a neighbour with whom Turkey has a considerable degree of friction.

NATO Rapid Reaction Forces

Turkey supplies one of a range of rapidly deployable command elements set up by NATO as part of the alliance's reform of force structure to meet new security challenges and threats. The Rapid Deployable Turkish Corps (RDTC) HQ is based on the 3rd Turkish Corps HQ, located near Istanbul. The combat, combat support and combat service support units assigned to the corps are among the TLFC's best equipped.

Ankara believes that Turkey's geography means the RDTC HQ is close to several potential crisis areas where it could in future be deployed. The TLFC has made alternative plans to deploy the HQ and other Turkish components of the corps by air, land and sea. As part of the preparation and certification process the 3rd Corps has conducted a number of command post exercises. The scenario for these exercises was based on the deployment of the corps by sea to a crisis area. To ensure this is more than a simulated capability, Turkey's Ministry of National Defence has signed contracts to enable the corps to use civilian roll-on, roll-off ships.

Cyprus

Since Turkey intervened in Cyprus in 1974, it has maintained a large force in the Turkish Cypriot enclave in the north of the island. One complete corps of the 4th Army, totalling about 36,000 troops and including two mechanised infantry divisional HQs, known as the 'Cyprus Turkish Peace Force', is stationed in northern Cyprus. The force is not assigned to NATO.

Internal security and northern Iraq

The TLF has been heavily involved in internal security duties, especially in regard to countering the threat from the PKK, which during the 1990s was waging a major guerrilla campaign in the eastern part of the country, especially in the southeastern region close to the border with Iraq and Syria. Since the late 1990s, the threat from the PKK has greatly receded, but Turkey remains concerned about the estimated 3,000-5,000 PKK guerrillas in northern Iraq. In the wake of the overthrow of the Saddam Hussein regime in the 2003 Iraq War, Ankara indicated that it expected US forces in Iraq to confront the PKK, but this is looking extremely unlikely.

Over the years, Turkish forces have launched major incursions into northern Iraq to flush out PKK militants. A significant proportion of the Turkish Army's strength, especially elements of the 2nd and 3rd Army, was assigned to a counter-insurgency mission during the height of the PKK insurgency. As the PKK threat declined, the army began scaling down its presence in the southeast, and in 2001 handed over some the of the military's former security duties to the Gendarmerie.

However, the military has continued to have a focus on the border with Iraq in light of the PKK presence in the Kurdish region of northern Iraq and the volatile situation in the region following the ousting of the Saddam Hussein regime. It has been estimated that about 15,000 Turkish troops are stationed along the border. Since the 1990s, Turkey has also maintained forces inside the border with northern Iraq because of its security concerns in the region. Under an agreement with the Kurdish Democratic Party (KDP), Turkey has been deploying about 1,500 commandos in a 20km zone inside Iraq, along the border with Turkey.

Special Forces

There are four commando brigades assigned to Special Forces Command. The 1st Commando Brigade is based at Kayseri and includes two paratroop battalions. From 1984 the brigade was assigned to anti-PKK operations in southeast Anatolia. Also deployed in the region with the same mission was the 2nd Commando Brigade, based at Bolu. The 3rd Commando Brigade is based at Midyat and the Mountain Commando Brigade is based at Hakkari.

Other deployments

ISAF: Turkey, with 1,400 personnel, assumed control of the 5,000-strong International Security Assistance Force (ISAF), which had previously been commanded by the UK, on 20 June 2002. Its mandate lasted six months. Turkey was replaced by a joint command provided by Germany and the Netherlands, in turn replaced by NATO.

It was announced in June 2004 that Turkey had agreed to resume a bigger role in Afghanistan, commanding ISAF once again from February 2005 with 1,800 troops including the 100 already deployed. In May 2004, Turkey agreed to send three S-70 Black Hawk utility helicopters to provide support to ISAF operations.

SEEBRIG: Turkey has contributed a mechanised infantry brigade consisting of about 1,000 men to a Balkans region peacekeeping force, the South-Eastern Europe Brigade (SEEBRIG), which formally came into being in August 1999 with headquarters initially in Plovdiv, Bulgaria. The other participating countries are Albania, Bulgaria, the Former Yugoslavia Republic of Macedonia (FYROM), Greece, and Italy. All major units are home-based, except when deployed on operations or exercises.

Peace Support Operations

UN contributions
As of December 2004, the following were deployed in UN operations:

* UNOMIG (Georgia) - 5 military observers

NATO contributions
As of January 2005, the following were deployed in operations under NATO's mandate:

* ISAF (Afghanistan) - 1,800 (from February 2005)
* KFOR (Kosovo, Serbia and Montenegro) - Task Force (battalion-sized) joint with Azerbajan
* EUFOR (Bosnia) - 1,200

Operational Art and Tactical Doctrine

Turkey's membership of NATO means that tactics and doctrine reflect the norms of the West, especially those of the US.

In 1994 the Turkish Land Forces Command (TLFC) set up the Training and Doctrine Command of the Land Forces (EDOK), based in Ankara. EDOK, which has been focusing on the requirements of the land forces up to the year 2020, has been working in the following areas: developing operational concepts and doctrine; developing training standards and programmes; the requirements for training future leaders of all ranks; developing future combat organisations; and determining new material requirements and material technology. US military advisers have been assigned to assist the work of EDOK.

Training

In most of its training programmes, the TAF follows US procedures. Conscripts destined for the army usually undergo basic training in army corps that are separate from the combat units. After about 14 weeks of basic and specialisation training, the recruits are assigned either to combat units or, depending on qualifications, to one of a number of army schools providing specialised or advanced training. Non-commissioned officers (NCOs) who plan to make a career in the army and who have a long-term enlistment undergo training courses for two years at the NCO schools.

Officer cadets receive training at the Turkish Military Academy, sometimes known as the War Academy. Those who complete the course successfully graduate as second lieutenants. Many of those who enter the Military Academy come from a number of military high schools operated under the supervision of the Turkish General Staff, where there is an emphasis on courses considered useful to a career in the armed services, such as science, mathematics and languages. Entry to these high schools is difficult, as is entry to the Military Academy, with only a small percentage of applicants being accepted.

Medical doctors serving with the armed forces are generally educated at the Military Medical School, while other specialists such as dentists, pharmacists and veterinarians receive their professional training in civilian academies before entering military service.

There are a number of further courses available to serving officers, the most prestigious being provided by the General Staff College in Istanbul. Officers of the rank of captain and above may apply for a place at the college and, if selected, undertake a two-year course which, if completed successfully, qualifies them for the coveted general staff corps designation. This can lead to general staff appointments, or to important command appointments. Officers of the rank of major and above can attend the Armed Forces Academy, where courses range from administration to strategy and tactics. Officers of the rank of lieutenant colonel or colonel may avail of courses at the National Security Academy.

Specialised training for the four commando brigades is carried out at the Egirdir Mountain Commando School and Training Centre. Officers, NCOs and enlisted men are all trained at the centre.

A co-operation deal signed by Russia and Turkey in January 2002 provided for the exchange of troops for training purposes.

Training Areas

Unit
Type
Location

Army engineering
Advanced/supplementary training, engineering
Kagithane, near Istanbul

Artillery units
Advanced/supplementary training, artillery
Polath

Commandos
Advanced/supplementary training, commando tactics
Egirdir

Armour units
Advanced/supplementary training, armour
Ankara

Army aviation
Advanced/supplementary training, army aviation
Ankara

Army Bases

Headquarters, Turkish General Staff (HQTGS), Ankara
Headquarters, 1st Army, Istanbul
Headquarters, 2nd Army, Malatya
Headquarters, 3rd Army, Erzincan
Headquarters, 4th Army, Izmir

Army Aviation:

Istanbul-Sarigazi, 1st Aviation Regiment
Malatya, 2nd Aviation Regiment
Erzincan, 3rd Aviation Regiment
Izmir, Aegean Aviation Regiment
Ankara-Guverncinlik, Attack Helicopter Battalion

Inventory: Armour

Type
Role
Quantity
In Service

M60A1/A3TTS
Main Battle Tank
1,000+
274/658

Leopard 1 variants
Main Battle Tank
307
307

M48/A5T1/T2
Main Battle Tank
3,000+
2,876 (1)

Akrep
Reconnaissance Vehicle
n/a
(3)

MARS-V (4 × 4) Cobra LAV
Reconnaissance Vehicle
n/a
100

BTR-60PB
Reconnaissance Vehicle
n/a
302

Condor
Reconnaissance Vehicle
n/a
25

Shorland
Reconnaissance Vehicle
n/a
200

UR-416
Reconnaissance Vehicle
n/a
34

Gage
Reconnaissance Vehicle
n/a
200

Dragoon 300
Reconnaissance Vehicle
n/a
60

FNSS TAIFV
Infantry Fighting Vehicle
650
In delivery, 2004

M113 A/A1/A2T/A3
Infantry Fighting Vehicle
n/a
2,813

BTR-80
Infantry Fighting Vehicle
n/a
80

M125 A1
Infantry Fighting Vehicle
n/a
10

Akrep ACV 300 Mk2
Armoured Combat Vehicle
n/a
665

FNSS Variants
Armoured Personnel Carrier
1,698
1,048

M113/A1/A2
Armoured Personnel Carrier
3,000
2,800e

BTR-80
Armoured Personnel Carrier
100
100

BTR-60PB
Armoured Personnel Carrier
350
350

Note:

(1). 162 x Leopard 1A1A1 being upgraded with a new thermal imaging FCS by Aselsan; work should be complete by 2006.
(2). 1,369 x M-48A5T1 and 750 x M-48A5T2 MBTs in store, some 48 A5T2 upgraded to M60A2 standard; some 1,350+ M48A5T1 upgraded to M60A1 standard.
(3). By mid-2004 over 250 vehicles, including variants had been delivered.

Inventory: Artillery

Type
Role
Quantity
In Service

203 mm M110A2
Self-Propelled Howitzer
220
219

203 mm M55
Self-Propelled Howitzer
9
9

175 mm M107
Self-Propelled Gun
36
36

155 mm Firtina (T-155)
Self-Propelled Howitzer
300+ (1)
8

155 mm Panter
Towed Howitzer
24 (2)
12

155 mm M44T
Self-Propelled Howitzer
168
155

105 mm M108
Self-Propelled Howitzer
26
26

105 mm M52A1
Self-Propelled Howitzer
425
365

203 mm M115
Howitzer (Towed)
162
160

155 mm M59 (Long Tom)
Gun (Towed)
170
170

155 mm M114A1/A2
Gun (Towed)
130
130

150 mm Skoda
Artillery (Towed)
128
72

105 mm M101A1
Howitzer (Towed)
640
640

75 mm M116
Howitzer (Towed)
n/a
180

227 mm MLRS
Multiple Rocket System
12
12

122 mm T-122
Multiple Rocket System
n/a
n/a

110 mm LARS
Multiple Rocket System
50
50

107 mm
Multiple Rocket System
48
48

70 mm
Multiple Rocket System
24
24

120 mm MKEK Tosam HY-12DI
Heavy Mortar
580
580

107 mm M30
Mortar
1,270
1,264

81 mm MKEK UT/NTI
Mortar
3,800
3,800

60 mm MKEK Commando
Mortar
n/a
n/a

60 mm M2
Mortar
n/a
n/a

Note: The TLF has been involved in a major upgrade of artillery equipment. The TLF has also decided to acquire TPQ-37 Firefinder radars to detect enemy artillery and has been building up its holding of multiple rocket launchers, adding a significant rocket artillery element to the existing comprehensive tube artillery capabilities of the army.
The TLF has taken delivery from the US of the ATACMS (Army Tactical Missile System), a semi-guided surface-to-surface missile with a range of 30 to 165 km.

(1). Total requirement - deliveries began in 2003.
(2). Full requirement has not been revealed - six were delivered in 2002 and a further 18 were being manufactured at that time.

Inventory: Anti-Tank Weapons

Type
Role
Quantity
In Service

Cobra
Anti-Tank Guided Missile
186
186

TOW SP
Anti-Tank Guided Missile
365
360

MILAN
Anti-Tank Guided Missile
395
390

Eryx
Anti-Tank Guided Missile
n/a
550e

106 mm M40A1
Recoilless Rifle
2,330
2,330

75 mm
Recoilless Rifle
620
620

57 mm M18
Recoilless Rifle
925
920

66 mm M72
Rocket Launcher
n/a
n/a

LAW
Light Anti-Tank Weapon
n/a
n/a

Inventory: Air Defence Weapons

Type
Role
Quantity
In Service

Stinger
Manportable SAM
108
108

Redeye
Manportable SAM
790
n/a (1)

For Stinger
Pedestal-Mounted Air-Defence System
148
10

40 mm L60/70
Anti-Aircraft Gun
600/800
600/800

40 mm T-1
Anti-Aircraft Gun
40
40

40 mm M42A1
Anti-Aircraft Gun
260
260

35 mm GDF-003
Anti-Aircraft Gun
130
120

20 mm GAI-DO1
Light Anti-Aircraft Gun
440
420

12.7 mm M55
Light Anti-Aircraft Gun
160
160

Note:

(1). Probably all withdrawn

Inventory: Infantry Weapons

Type
Role

9 mm MKE
Pistol

.45 M1911A1
Pistol

5.56 mm M16A2
Carbine

5.56 mm M16A2
Assault Rifle

7.62 mm G3A3/A4
Assault Rifle

7.62 AKM
Assault Rifle

5.56 mm HK 33
Assault Rifle

9 mm HK MP5
Sub-Machine Gun

7.62 mm MG3
Machine Gun

7.62 mm FN MAG
Machine Gun

0.50 Browning M2 HB
Heavy Machine Gun

40 mm M203
Grenade Launcher

40 mm M79
Grenade Launcher

Note: Some members of the Gendarmerie and of the Village Guards, the militia set up in southeastern Turkey to counter the activities of the outlawed PKK, use AK-47/AKM rifles.

Inventory: Army Aviation

Type
Role
Quantity
In Service

AH-1P Huey Cobra
Combat Helicopter
38
36

AH-1S Huey Cobra
Combat Helicopter
12
10

AH-1W Super Cobra
Combat Helicopter
10
7

Bell OH-58B/206R
Observation Helicopter
3/20
3/18

Cessna U-17B
Observation
50
30

Beech King Air 200
Communications
5
4

Cessna 421B/C Golden Eagle
Communications
8
3

Augusta Bell AB 212
Communications Helicopter
3
2

Bell UH-1H Iroquois
Utility Helicopter
60e (1)
38

AB 204B
Utility Helicopter
12
12

Augusta Bell AB 205A
Utility Helicopter
69
50

Sikorsky S-70A28 Black Hawk
Utility Helicopter
45
34

Sikorsky S-70A28D Black Hawk
Utility Helicopter
50
50

AS 532UL Cougar
Utility Helicopter
30
29

S-70A Yarasa (Black Hawk) (2)
Utility Helicopter
2
2

Cessna T-41D Mescalero
Trainer
25
24

Champion 7GCBC Citabria
Trainer
40
30

Augusta-Bell AB 204B
Trainer
16
12

Augusta-Bell 206B JetRanger III
Trainer
30
25

Bell TAH-1P Huey Cobra
Trainer
4
4

Beech King Air 2000
Mapping
2
2

Harpy
Unmanned Aerial Vehicle
n/a
n/a

CL-89 (AN/USD-501)
Unmanned Aerial Vehicle
n/a
n/a

Gnat 750
Unmanned Aerial Vehicle
n/a
n/a

Falcon 600
Unmanned Aerial Vehicle
n/a
n/a

Note: Some helicopters are armed with Raytheon FIM-92 Stinger air-to-air missiles, Hellfire 2 AGM-114M and Raytheon BGM-71 TOW air-to-surface missiles.

(1). 120 shared by air force and army aviation.
(2). Special Forces variant.
 

cyborg69

В наряде по кухне
#25
Турция ввела бронетехнику и спецназ в населенный пункт Силопи провинции Ширнак



 
#27
Турки бодро начали год

3-я бронетанковая бригада на полигоне у проливов





28-я мех дивизия на другом полигоне у тех же проливов только с другой стороны


 
#30
2-й корпус ТА провел учения подразделений противотанкистов ;)
Отстреляли ТАУ, Миланы и др



 
#32
есть ли у Турции авиационные противокорабельные ракеты?
Есть. Harpoon, Sea Skua, SLAM-ER и возможно АS.12 и Penguin (если они вообще были в варианте авиационного базирования и еще не протухли). Exocet ЕМНИП есть только в корабельном варианте.
 
#33
Есть. Harpoon, Sea Skua, SLAM-ER и возможно АS.12 и Penguin (если они вообще были в варианте авиационного базирования и еще не протухли). Exocet ЕМНИП есть только в корабельном варианте.
А кто авианоситель Гарпуна,SLAM-ER в Турции?Есть хоть одна фотка?
Теоретически может еще их ракета SOM,если допили по подвижным целям.
 
#35
А кто авианоситель Гарпуна,SLAM-ER в Турции?Есть хоть одна фотка?
Теоретически может еще их ракета SOM,если допили по подвижным целям.
еще один носитель

Турецкие патрульные самолеты CN-235-100MPA преследовали российский ракетный корабль «Зелёный Дол»



14 февраля новейший малый ракетный корабль (МРК) Черноморского флота «Зелёный Дол» проекта 21631 и морской тральщик «Ковровец» проекта 266М прошли Черноморские проливы и вошли в акваторию Средиземного моря.

Во время прохождения Босфора над российскими боевыми кораблями пролетел патрульный самолет CN-235-100MPA военно-морских сил Турции, а спустя несколько часов над кораблями снова заметили аналогичный самолет но уже Береговой охраны Турции.


CN-235-100MPA представляет собой морской патрульный самолет, который оснащен тепловизорной системой переднего обзора FLIR-2000HP и системой Northrop Grumman (Litton) AN/ALR-86(V), также системой AMASCOS компании Thales и комплексом сбора разведывательной информации.

Самолет CN-235-100MPA позволяет ВМС и Береговой охране Турции выполнять задачи по патрулированию в 120 милях от берега и в случае необходимости применить противолодочные торпеды и противокорабельные ракеты AGM-84 Harpoon или AM.39 Exocet.

http://military-informant.com/navy/...ossiyskiy-raketnyiy-korabl-zelyonyiy-dol.html
 

Олег Грановский

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Команда форума
#36
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_modern_weapons_of_the_Turkish_Air_Force

В этом списке только AGM-84H/K SLAM-ER (а это не ПКР, а КР на базе "Гарпун"). Ссылка идёт сюда:
http://www.deagel.com/news/Turkey-P...arpoon-Foreign-Military-Sales_n000001762.aspx

This contract also provides for the procurement of 48 SLAM-ER tactical missiles (Turkey) and 2 each SLAM-ER Guidance Sections (Turkey); SLAM-ER Warhead Sections (Turkey); SLAM-ER Sustainer Sections (Turkey); SLAM-ER Control Sections (Turkey); SLAM-ER Exercise Missiles (Turkey); SLAM-ER Captive Air Training Missiles (Turkey); ... In addition, this contract provides for the procurement of 3 SLAM-ER Instrumented Recoverable Air Test Vehicles (Turkey), 59 SLAM-ER All Up Round (AUR) Missile Containers (Turkey)...
Отсюда видно, что по крайней мере в 2007 г. Турки "Гарпун" воздушного базирования не покупали, а только SLAM-ER.

http://www.f-16.net/f-16_armament_article12.html

Turkey: The TUAF purchased 50 Harpoon missiles for their CCIP-upgraded F-16 Block 50 aircraft
(опять же со SLAM перепутали, выше как раз о 50 --- 48+2; Пост Natan выше - это SLAM, не Harpoon)

SS.12 были в Турции, не уверен насчёт AS.12. В любом случае сняты с вооружения.

Sea Skua у Турции были, возможно ещё на вооружении.

Exocet воздушного базирования у Турции небыло.

Penguin - есть:
http://www.naval-technology.com/projects/penguin-anti-ship-missile/

Kongsberg secured a NOK210m ($40.9m) contract in March 2008 to deliver Penguin missiles for the Turkish Navy's new Sikorsky helicopters.
 
#37
А кто авианоситель Гарпуна,SLAM-ER в Турции?Есть хоть одна фотка?
Теоретически может еще их ракета SOM,если допили по подвижным целям.
SLAM-ER является F-16



Гарпунов теоретически тоже Ф-16

и возможно Фантомы. По крайней мере израильские Фантомы могли их нести, а именно IAI модернизировали турецкие Фантомы.
 

Олег Грановский

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Команда форума
#38
и возможно Фантомы. По крайней мере израильские Фантомы могли их нести, а именно IAI модернизировали турецкие Фантомы.
В Израиле небыло ПКР воздушного базирования. ИАИ разработали "Габриель-3AS" и были их фото на "Фантомах", "Скайхоках" и "Кфирах", но АОИ эту модель на вооружение не приняла.
 
#39
В Израиле небыло ПКР воздушного базирования. ИАИ разработали "Габриель-3AS" и были их фото на "Фантомах", "Скайхоках" и "Кфирах", но АОИ эту модель на вооружение не приняла.
Могли нести не значит, что несли, а значит, что имели такую возможность.
 

Олег Грановский

Модератор
Команда форума
#40
"Могли нести" - означает интеграцию авионики самолёта для работы с той или иной системой или оружием. В случае израильских "Фантомов" такой интеграции небыло.